Our current cohort

Aisha de Barros lopes

Aisha de Barros lopes

Aisha de Barros Lopes
My first involvement in campaigning was through my participation in rallies and petitions whilst living and studying in Melbourne from 2013 to 2016. It was while living in the big city that I came to recognise the importance of, and the momentum of change that is generated through direct action.

I currently work as Projects and Events Coordinator at Cairns and Far North Environment Centre (CAFNEC). CAFNEC is a not-for-profit organisation, and is the peak environmental body campaigning and advocating for environmental issues in Far North Queensland. In my role, I work closely with the community, schools, and other environmental groups, organising educational projects and events that foster environmental awareness. I am also responsible for recruiting volunteers, and engaging and supporting our volunteer network.

As an intern first, and now an employee of CAFNEC I have been involved in smaller local campaigning issues, as well as the broader environmental issues of state and national importance. I have been heavily involved in the Land Clearing Campaign in 2017, in the lead up to the Queensland state election, whereby I collaborated with other environmental organisations, helped in developing and planning a campaign strategy, created informative resources for the public, and hosted a candidate forum here in Cairns. Our current campaign is to make climate change the election issue. We want our government to make the switch to renewable energy. Thus far, I have worked closely with my colleagues and our volunteers in developing a campaign strategy for this, as well as facilitated a Rise for Climate Rally as part of the Global Day of Action for Climate Change.

 

Alice Eggleston

Alice Eggleston

Alice Eggleston
I am a Registered Nurse with a Master of Public Health based in Sydney, grew up in Newcastle.

Currently a campaign organiser for the Climate and Health Alliance, mobilising health professionals to take action on climate change and pushing the government to develop a National Strategy on Climate Change and Health.

I believe grassroots community groups are more powerful than big business and politicians and is how we will create change.

Climate change is the biggest health threat humanity has ever faced. We are already seeing the health impacts today, from the increase in natural disasters such as heatwaves, droughts and bushfires.

 

Angie Judd

Angie Judd

Angie Judd
After finishing my undergraduate degree in mid-2017 I went along to an event called Power Shift, where I was I introduced to power of organising by the Australian Youth Climate Coalition (AYCC). I began to look for more opportunities to get involved, taking on a leadership position in my state AYCC branch and participating in the Women’s Environmental Leadership Australia program in 2018.

I’m passionate about bridging the intersections between social and environmental issues, which has kept me involved in AYCC’s fight for climate justice. I’m now working as an organiser at the AYCC supporting young people in Victoria to take action on campaigns to Stop Adani, repower schools with renewable energy and to ban fracking in the NT, alongside studying for my Master of Public Policy.

 

Emily Kain

Emily Kain

Emily Kain
I fell in love with community organising at Australian Youth Climate Coalition (AYCC)’s 2015 national summit. There, I learned about the many layers of injustice that will be brought about or worsened by climate change and was empowered to take action. Learning about the power of organised people excited me so greatly, I decided I needed to learn all I could about organising by diving in head first. In 2015, I led the schools program in Wollongong and continued to volunteer with AYCC as the Galilee Basin campaign ramped up in 2016-17.

In 2017, I was hired by GetUp as a Stop Adani organiser, supporting the leadership and local campaign activities of 50 community groups across three states. I was also involved in coordinating major events such as the #StopAdani human signs and summits.

I am currently a community organiser at the Australian Conservation Foundation based in Brisbane. I support ACF Community Groups across south east Queensland to grow the ACF Community in Queensland, building an engaged and powerful constituency of people who will speak out and act for nature. Our current priority is to have 1 million conversations about climate damage in the lead up to the 2019 federal election.

 

Emma Bleasel

Emma Bleasel

Emma Bleasel
I was first introduced to the wonderful world of community organising when I completed a fundamentals course while working at The Wilderness Society in 2017. I was amazed at the power of the community to make change when they are passionate about a cause.

I studied a Bachelor of International Studies majoring in anthropology and gender studies. I then volunteered for as many other organisations as I could, including the Australian Youth Climate Coalition (AYCC) where I volunteered as a state organiser for NSW while also volunteering with World Wildlife Fund (WWF) on their Earth Hour campaign for two years.

I am currently a community organiser for 350.org Australia supporting local groups and universities in South Australia and Western Australia. I help run divestment campaigns, where we pressure governments, institutions and universities to move away from fossil fuels to 100% renewables. What draws me to the issue of climate change is the fact it encompasses so many injustices that affect people in so many ways.

 

Emma Horsburgh

Emma Horsburgh

Emma Horsburgh
I’m currently a Community Organiser at Environment Victoria, where we are working to transition Victoria away from fossil fuels and towards 100% renewable energy. My work focuses on building a network of volunteers across the state to scale up our organising capacity.

In 2018, I have been focused on supporting our voter contact and youth enrolment strategies within our state election campaign. I cut my organising teeth at the Australian Youth Climate Coalition as NSW State Coordinator, while interning at GetUp, and through involvement in campus organising while at university.

I have a degree in International Relations with a specialisation in feminist security studies. I also run a small-scale livestock farm with my partner in central Victoria.

 

Janette Huston

Janette Huston

Janette Huston
I was voluntarily involved in Landcare for more than 25 years starting with Greening Australia‘s Ribbons of Green program, then secretary for nearly 20 years to the Wooroloo Brook LCDC (Landcare ). I was a Teacher and an Environmental Educator and was both employed and contracting in the field.

My new passion is fracking and I have been a Knitting Nanna for 2-3 years. I felt that it was a great way to get the message out there about the issue of fracking. Although I am not a nanna nor can I knit very well, it is a great way of promoting the cause and you tend to get away with things you couldn’t normally do.

As a Nanna we have sit-ins in front of politician’s offices, we meet politicians at their office, events and at Parliament House. We work with Lock the Gate and attend events and stalls where we either sit and knit or field questions or get signatures for petitions.

Since becoming a Nanna, I have done a short course on Community Organising with a union United Voice and have attended the Beyond Oil and Gas Jamboree in Queensland this year. I also attended a nine week course on Advanced Public Speaking so that when I give a presentation I can change thinking in just eight minutes!

 

James Stanton-Cooke

James Stanton-Cooke

Jimmy Stanton-Cooke
I’m a passionate earthling who loves this Planet Earth. I have been been an environmental activist for 25 years. It distress me that humanity has inflicted such damage in such a short period of time and I wish to find solutions for behavioural and attitude change to protect what essentially is the backbones of the planet – the environment’s ecosystems, biodiversity, water, and more.

I’m literally Half Cut about the issues such that I have founded my own charity BeardsOn for Conservation that has sister campaign BraidsOn and younger brother Half Cut that has helped plant over 40,000 native trees and protected over 90,000 acres of rainforest globally with partners Rainforest Trust. For 365 days I am proudly sporting  a half cut beard to end deforestation and open cut mines — protest on my face to raise the urgent need for people to act.

I am Sydney Co-ordinator for Lock The Gate Alliance and my other passion is to end further coal and coal seam gas mines in New South Wales and Australia and transition towards renewables. Supporting First Nations people, communities, prime agricultural land, health, water, air, and climate.

 

Karen Uy

Karen Uy

Karen Uy
Growing up in the beautiful islands of the Philippines, I have always felt a strong sense of connection and belonging to the ocean. I’d lose track of time and be mesmerised by the dance of light and shadow on the ocean floor. I was fascinated by marine life, corals and sponges in shades of colour that words fail to aptly describe. Riding waves and being immersed in the warmth of the ocean, it felt more than just my playground, it felt like I was truly “home”.

My love for the ocean only strengthened as I grew older. With a growing consciousness of how marine ecosystems were increasingly being impacted by unsustainable fishing practices and climate damage, I started volunteering in and eventually working for various institutions (University of the Philippines-Marine Science Institute; Aurora Marine Research and Development Institute) and organisations (Ocean-Action Resource Center Inc. etc) in the Philippines that partnered with grassroots communities to establish community-based Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), advocated for climate justice and spearheaded marine conservation and education campaigns.

More recently, as a Communications and Mobilisation fellow in the Australian Conservation Foundation, I’ve been involved with volunteer training and support, and diversity and inclusion initiatives to connect with and engage student organisations, faith leaders and multicultural communities outside ACF’s traditional support base.

I am also currently organising a Vic Uni student-led environmental group with other leaders from my community development class. We envision that through the celebration and strategic use of our diverse culture – music, visual art, poetry and theater as multiple methods to tell stories (a.k.a. creative community organising), we learn how to imagine ourselves as communities empowered to create change, and in the process forge genuine solidarity and community amongst our diverse communities in the Inner West Melbourne area.

 

Lucy Graham

Lucy Graham

Lucy Graham
I grew up in far north Queensland in between the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area and the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, a childhood that taught me a keen passion for nature, people, and culture. Both my parents are incredible activists and being brought up off the grid, connected to nature, and with the idea that we are stewards of the world and each other, I developed strong values that helped me to be the activist I am today, although it took a little while to get there. I worked for some years as an outdoor educator, helping young people form bonds with nature and each other, but slowly realised that the impact I was having was not immediate enough.

I went to university to study sustainability and became an activist, discovering the power of people to create change. I campaigned as a volunteer to go fossil free, to protect the reef, stop Adani and worked locally and nationally. But I still felt that I needed to learn more, so I came to the big smoke – Brisbane. After moving here, I discovered community organising. I did a two day course with The Wilderness Society and knew that this was the work I wanted to do. Since then I have been working at GetUp as an organiser, learning from the organisation, my colleagues and books! GetUp is getting ready for the upcoming federal election and I am working with a State Support Team and 7 Action Groups in our volunteer network.

I am so excited to have the opportunity to hone my understanding of organising, be in a peer environment, and learn how to really change things!

 

Maggie Mckeown

Maggie Mckeown

Maggie McKeown
My first taste of organising was volunteering with the Whitsunday Residents Against Dumping (WRAD) and since then I have been hooked. Uniting and activating people to protect our communities and environment feeds the soul.

After spending time volunteering with WRAD and Australian Marine Conservation Society in Airlie Beach on Reef focused campaigns I worked with the Mackay Conservation Group. In an area with a powerful mining industry influence, I helped to build and maintain a drumbeat of local opposition to the Adani Carmichael Mine.

I look forward to seeing this campaign out, stopping Adani once and for all, and making sure that Australia moves rapidly beyond coal.

 

Margaret Pestorius

Margaret Pestorius

Margaret Pestorius
Margaret Pestorius is a long-term peace activist who lives on the Land of the Walubara Yidindji – Gimuy. She started as a forest activist using nonviolence with the legendary Melbourne Rainforest Action Group which ran a campaign to reduce the use of Malaysian rainforest timbers which entered Australia through the port of Melbourne.

From involvement in the 90s supporting local members of the Gulf Peace Team, attending Aidex91 and working on the Benalla Women’s Peace Camp, Margaret has developed and maintained many relationships in Australia and overseas. In 2016, she was a member of the Pine Gap Pilgrims, a group that entered the Pine Gap prohibited area to pray and play music.

With her husband Bryan Law (Rocky Tiger Ploughshares) and friends, she set up Cairns Peace by Peace, a group which used strategic nonviolence to stop visits of US warships to her home town of Gimuy [Cairns].

As a practising social worker she has a strong interest in empowerment, capacity building and ethical, reflective, and participatory governance. In recent years she has helped formed Australian Nonviolence Projects, Wage Peace and Beyond War to assist the peace movement meet objectives.

 

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry
I started my journey fighting for climate justice when I fell ill in high school. During that time fighting illness I resolved to use my energy to help other people – I saw climate change as the number one threat to people around the world, so I naturally started looking for ways to do something about it!

In university 350.org introduced me to community organising, and the power to create social change through uniting and empowering people under a common cause. Since then I’ve worked on a bunch of different campaigns, starting in Perth, WA with state election organising on conservation issues – then in Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney on different by-elections, in the #StopAdani campaign, assisting on the ban Fracking campaign in the NT, and the Hands off our Charities campaign.

As of writing I’m currently assisting awesome young students to go organise school strikes for climate action in WA and QLD! I’m not sure what’s next but I’m determined to continually fight for a better world and for climate justice.

 

Melinda Millen

Melinda Millen

Melinda Millen
I am a Network Organiser with Climate Action Network Australia, supporting members by building relationships and their capacity to organise as well as coordinating events and meetings for member collaboration. I’m based on the land of the Eora Nation (Sydney) and am a core organiser for Stop Adani with my local Climate Action Network. A member of the New Economy Network Australia, I am passionate about a post-capitalist economic system with foundations in ecological health and social justice.

Many years ago, I transitioned from marketing and communications in the private sector to carbon management, although I became frustrated by the incremental and insufficient environmental progress by businesses that prioritise shareholders’ interests. So I completed a Master of Environmental Management and then led within 350.org’s Fossil Free UNSW divestment campaign and Share Sydney (a collective that encourages community development through sharing of resources). I’m now trying to squeeze in more camping with my young family, yoga and pilates.

 

Melissa Abel

Melissa Abel

Melissa Abel
I am predominantly a stay-at-home mum and am new to community organising, having only really started my journey a bit over a year ago, but I’ve thrown myself enthusiastically into multiple volunteer roles. I am the convener of the local Australian Conservation Foundation community group, having started the group with a friend in November 2017.

I’m on the publicity team of my local branch of Rural Australians for Refugees, as well as being the acting secretary.

I’m also a facilitator for Climate For Change, helping people to have productive conversations about climate change with the people they care about, in order to empower people to act and build the movement for effective action on climate change. As such, I am highly involved in the day-to-day running of the groups and am responsible for a lot of the behind the scenes administration. However, I am particularly passionate about the strategic planning, event organising, and publicity and media aspects of action groups and how they relate to the broader community in bringing about the changes we would like to see.

 

Nicole Sleeman

Nicole Sleeman

Nicole Sleeman
I am a General Practitioner, currently based in Cairns, far north Queensland.

I became involved in environmental advocacy in response to my own distress about environmental exploitation, followed by an increasing knowledge of Planetary Health – that human health is intimately related to, and ultimately relies upon, the ecosystem within which we exist. I have since been an active volunteer for Doctors for the Environment Australia and more recently, Health on the Frontline, and the Climate and Health Alliance (CAHA).

In 2017 I was a part of the Women’s Environmental Leadership Australia‘s cohort.

I am passionate about raising awareness and educating both the health sector and non-health citizens about Planetary Health and the need for each one of us to take action to look after the life systems that support human health.

In 2019 I will be working as a volunteer organiser for CAHA.

 

Oneal Waromi

Oneal Waromi

Oneal Waromi

I am West Papuan human right activist and a performer for The Change: Revolutionary HipHop Theatre here in Wurundjerri land.

It is the fruit of United Struggle Project, a music project that is addressing issues faced by displaced people/artists in affected areas, in which displaced by war, colonisation, development, poverty and environmental issues. What has driven me to get involved with Free West Papua campaign (https://www.freewestpapua.org) is only humanity. As West Papuan, I have a mandate from the Indigenous people and the land to stand up. All West Papuan activist have undergone lots of military brutality and displacement in our own land, does not matter in which aspect such as human right or environmental right. Since I have the opportunity to raise my voice here, I really want to see this grassroots movement growing and spread awareness about the struggle of West Papuan people. One Love.

 

Peter Arndt

Peter Arndt

Peter Arndt
I grew up in the Bjelke-Petersen era in Queensland and learned a lot about community campaigning through mainstream political action in the Labor Party in my home town of Ipswich. The election of Pauline Hanson as my local MP in 1996 motivated me to join with others in Ipswich who were concerned about Hanson’s politics to form the Ipswich Anti-Racism Committee. In two amazing years, we mobilised thousands of people to challenge Hanson’s racist message and to advocate for an inclusive multicultural society.

My work in Ipswich got me noticed by the Catholic Justice & Peace Commission of Brisbane which invited me to be a member in 1998 and appointed me as its Executive Officer in 2001. My 18 years working for the Commission has immersed me in a sea of wonderful experiences including working with the Queensland Conservation Council and the Australian Greenhouse Office on the Cool Communities project, participating in a FairWear campaign to get a mandatory code of practice to protect clothing outworkers in Queensland, supporting Aboriginal community leaders in their efforts to end the sorry history of Aboriginal deaths in custody, playing a key role in the Catholic Church’s involvement in the Queensland Community Alliance and getting knee-deep in Stop Adani Brisbane’s actions to end the madness of Adani’s Carmichael coal mine.

Throughout my tenure in the Commission, my passion for the freedom struggle of the people of West Papua has grown immensely. It has seen me build strong relationships with many political, community, and church groups in West Papua and with the solidarity movement across the Pacific. Since 2016, I have been working with a core team of organisers to develop the #MakeWestPapuaSafe Campaign which targets the Australian Government’s active support for members of Indonesia’s security forces who have routinely beaten, tortured, raped and killed many Papuans resisting the Indonesian occupation of their land.

 

Philip Winzer

Philip Winzer

Phil Winzer
I am first and foremost a Ngarabul & Wirrayaraay Murri from so-called New England, Northern New South Wales, and have been actively involved in fighting for Aboriginal rights and to protect country for over a decade.

My organising and campaigning are grounded in a deep passion for country and a strong belief in the necessity of decolonising and rooting ourselves in Indigenous ways of knowing, being and doing if our world is to survive the climate crisis that is already devastating Indigenous communities here and globally. With my own country facing a new wave of colonisation in the form of coal and coal seam gas extraction, I have been active in environmental campaigns to protect Gomeroi country for many years.

I have also been organising, campaigning and involved in frontline, on-the-ground anti-colonial resistance with the Warriors of the Aboriginal Resistance since 2014, including helping organise major protests like Genocidal20 (G20 2014) and Stolenwealth (Commonwealth Games 2018). I am now National Campaign and Organising Manager for Seed Indigenous Youth Climate Network, and lead the implementation of a corporate campaign targeting companies involved in fracking in the Northern Territory amongst our national network of young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Rebecca Howarth

Rebecca Howarth

Rebecca Howarth
I started campaigning for environmental issues at aged 10. I went on to be President of the Environmental Society at University whilst studying Ecology and Conservation. I have worked in ecology and research in the UK and then became interested in permaculture and organic food growth after coming to Australia.

I now run an organic and local food distribution hub with my friends called the Fat Beets Food Hub. I am also the Community Garden Co-ordinator at my local Neighbourhood House so it is a joy to organise programs and events that engage people in a therapeutic outdoor space.

My campaign work in recent years has involved being a founding member of Frack Free Tas and we were successful in fighting for a moratorium on fracking in Tasmania. I am now working with local and statewide groups in Tasmania to challenge the exponential growth of the salmon farm industry into our waters.

I am always privileged and delighted to work with so many passionate and caring people who share my drive for making this world just a little bit better, to protect the beautiful biodiversity that surrounds us, and safeguard a future for the generations after us.

 

Rebecca Langley

Rebecca Langley

Rebecca Langley
Rebecca is passionate about ending discrimination and addressing inequality by working with communities and organisations to amplify their voices and create the social changes that they want for their people. Rebecca has worked with many different groups including refugees and asylum seekers, local Indigenous communities and the West Papuan diaspora supporting their activities and connecting them with resources and other organisations to build solidarity and capacity.

 

Rob Rose

Rob Rose

Rob Rose
Robert Rose is a passionate nature lover who has worked with The Wilderness Society for nearly three years.

He has had a number of achievements including working on campaigns such as ending deforestation in Queensland, building numerous volunteer-run community groups and developing many strong volunteer leaders.

He enjoys getting out into nature, playing tennis, and Japanese culture.

 

Sabine Walther

Sabine Walther

Sabine Walther
I have always loved nature. Being out in the forest or in the ocean makes me incredibly happy and gives me peace. Almost all of my most wonderful and powerful experiences in life were in nature. These memories give me the drive and determination to stand up for the environment and I love to share that passion.

I started working in the environmental field at a green political foundation. After university, I joined an environmental fiscal policy think tank and organised students to hold lectures on eco-social market economy and sustainability at universities all over Germany.

Since being in Australia, I got involved with The Wilderness Society and their community organising program and zero deforestation campaign. After working as an organiser with the union United Voice, I joined the Australian Marine Conservation Society as community organiser on the Fight for our Reef campaign.

I am a firm believer of people power. I know that every individual’s effort to protect our natural world makes a difference and that together we have the power to create change and win campaigns. I am really excited to build grassroots power for our reef and oceans.

 

Sajit Shakya

Sajit Shakya

Sajit Shakya
My 10 years’ experience as an organiser, I have organised in several sectors namely; Home care, Early Childhood Education & Care, Commercial Cleaning, School Cleaning, and Casino has given me the insight in the importance of community organising to mobilise Australians around shared values, influence the political process and engage communities to win campaigns. Currently, I am the lead organiser for the casino/School cleaning team at United Voice and have to be part of decision making and strategy of campaigns ran by the union.
Sharing the ideas, experiences and stories will definitely advance my knowledge which I will be able to bring to my team and run successful campaigns with my team.

As an organiser, I have always worked in a team. I like to participate and tackle challenges without showing too many signs of stress or pressure. This is why diverse teams have the potential to be so effective, and it all depends on active listening. I have always been trained 80% listening and 20% talking so I respectfully consider the viewpoints and ideas of other people as well. I also like to share my opinion and ideas without trying to come up with a plan for taking credit for it. Transparency is key on a team, so I keep my team members informed.

As an organiser I like to take risks, step outside my comfort zone, and think outside of the box. Taking risks doesn’t work every time but if it doesn’t work I do ask myself what I could do better next time.

As a team lead I set team goals based on outcomes and results, rather than just on the amount of work being done. A clear plan can then be set about how they are going to achieve these objectives, as a group, as well as each individual’s contribution

 

Zoe Buckley Lennox

Zoe Buckley Lennox

Zoe Buckley-Lennox
I slipped down the slippery slope of activism almost eight years ago now, after I started getting involved in many local activist groups in Brisbane. It wasn’t until I took action at Maules Creek that stepped up to organise a local group which ran fundraisers, information nights and to recruit people to the front line camp.

Since then I have taken part in many high profile actions around the world with Greenpeace and ClimActs, climbing oil rigs, speaking to media and trying desperately to take down the fossil fuel industry. For my Honours thesis at university I lead a research project into the social physiology of direct action, and deeply reflected on my own activism and the role of direct action in not only fighting climate change, but in creating activist culture.

I only really got to sink my teeth into community organising when I started coordinating Fossil Free UQ, where we built an amazing student group, sat in the vice chancellor’s office twice and organised more than 200 people rallies at university. It was during that time I learnt about the power of community organising and my theory of change really cemented.

Right now I’m working closely with Tipping Point on the Stop Adani campaign, where we are unfolding an ambitious plan to scale up 1) stop Adani and 2) scale up the climate movement.

What are people saying about us?

Cate-Faehrmann

Cate Faehrmann, Director, Nature Conservation Council NSW, 2005

We did a two-day workshop with The Change Agency early this year which provided our organisation with some much-needed tools for strategic campaigning and planning. There was nothing but positive feedback from our staff and board members about what they gained from the two days spent with James and Sam. The power mapping exercise was particularly insightful for staff and board members alike and as a result our campaigns are more pro-active - we are seeing results!
2014-03-30T07:51:49+00:00
Cate-Faehrmann
We did a two-day workshop with The Change Agency early this year which provided our organisation with some much-needed tools for strategic campaigning and planning. There was nothing but positive feedback from our staff and board members about what they gained from the two days spent with James and Sam. The power mapping exercise was...
josh

Josh Creaser, Frontline Projects Coordinator, 350.org

Most campaigners would probably shudder at the thought of spending ten whole days away from the frantic world of actions and meetings, to invest time in their own reflection and learning. The Community Organising Fellowship forces you to do just that – and what a gift and opportunity that time becomes.

 The Fellowship is a unique combination of ingredients. Time for pause and reflection. Discussion with leading thinkers. Connections to a wide array of campaigns. Guidance from experienced and caring facilitators. Bonds formed with 25 inspiring campaigners from across the country.

 These ingredients are brought together with carefully crafted methods. Thought-provoking stories. Challenging questions. Developing crucial skills. Applying new methods and tools. Preparing new plans for real world projects. 

 The result? Ten days that couldn’t have been better spent for someone that is looking to challenge their assumptions, deepen their understanding of why we organise in communities and feel ready to go forward with greater focus and vigour in their work.
2015-03-17T20:56:37+00:00
josh
Most campaigners would probably shudder at the thought of spending ten whole days away from the frantic world of actions and meetings, to invest time in their own reflection and learning. The Community Organising Fellowship forces you to do just that – and what a gift and opportunity that time becomes.  The Fellowship is a...
clairevh

Claire Van Herpen, Environment Victoria

The Community Organising fellowship provides a positive and nurturing environment in which to learn and apply the practical skills required to effectively mobilise communities to create change. It's a great opportunity to learn from others in the environmental movement and provides space for collaboration and reflection.
2015-03-17T19:26:27+00:00
clairevh
The Community Organising fellowship provides a positive and nurturing environment in which to learn and apply the practical skills required to effectively mobilise communities to create change. It’s a great opportunity to learn from others in the environmental movement and provides space for collaboration and reflection.
Six Degrees

Sam Robb, Six Degrees

When I’m amongst passionate and talented people, I always feel like our movement can be powerful. But after the last 10 days, I not only feel we can be powerful, I know we can. I know how we can be and that is a unique and invaluable gift. The quality and consideration of the facilitation and subject matter was astonishing, and there was a group wide acknowledgement of both an immense privilege of being a part of the cohort and a resounding responsibility to use and share what we felt and learnt.
2014-05-23T17:11:47+00:00
Six Degrees
When I’m amongst passionate and talented people, I always feel like our movement can be powerful. But after the last 10 days, I not only feel we can be powerful, I know we can. I know how we can be and that is a unique and invaluable gift. The quality and consideration of the facilitation...
harry

Harry Jennens, The Climate and Health Action Network

The Fellowship has increased both my skills in community organising and my confidence in sharing these skills with others.  The immersive workshop format has provided precious space for face-to-face learning, sharing ideas with facilitators and other delegates, and building strong relationships with current and future collaborators in the climate movement.  I am confident that our entire cohort will go on to empower others in our communities, and that we’ll continue to support each other in this work.  The Fellowship will be instrumental in helping us build a broad, diverse and powerful movement.
2015-03-17T19:36:21+00:00
harry
The Fellowship has increased both my skills in community organising and my confidence in sharing these skills with others.  The immersive workshop format has provided precious space for face-to-face learning, sharing ideas with facilitators and other delegates, and building strong relationships with current and future collaborators in the climate movement.  I am confident that our...
Emilie Carey

Emilie Carey, Solar Citizens


I really admired your facilitation skills. I learnt lots watching you guide us through the evening. I'll definitely be using lessons from last night. You're a total pro and I'm really grateful you're generous enough to share your knowledge.

2016-03-25T10:35:26+00:00
Emilie Carey
I really admired your facilitation skills. I learnt lots watching you guide us through the evening. I’ll definitely be using lessons from last night. You’re a total pro and I’m really grateful you’re generous enough to share your knowledge.
Shani Tager

Shani Tager, Friends of the Earth

The fellowship has been really useful in helping me become more disciplined in the strategic planning process and able to clearly communicate why we’re doing what we’re doing. The facilitation team have been fantastic and having theory drawn out from our own experiences and then immediately applied to our campaigns means I’ll be returning to my team with a solid analysis of how we can be more effective.
2014-05-10T21:52:42+00:00
Shani Tager
The fellowship has been really useful in helping me become more disciplined in the strategic planning process and able to clearly communicate why we’re doing what we’re doing. The facilitation team have been fantastic and having theory drawn out from our own experiences and then immediately applied to our campaigns means I’ll be returning to...
cherry

Cherry Muddle, Australian Marine Conservation Society

The Community Organising Fellowship has rooted in me a deeper sense of belonging to an intentional, international movement to create the positive changes we wish to see in society, environment, culture and climate. The program delivery is varied, fluid and always interesting. The strengths and highlights for me include learning through shared experience and critical analysis. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed forging strong connections and bonds between fellow organisers, facilitators and guest speakers.
2015-03-17T21:02:16+00:00
cherry
The Community Organising Fellowship has rooted in me a deeper sense of belonging to an intentional, international movement to create the positive changes we wish to see in society, environment, culture and climate. The program delivery is varied, fluid and always interesting. The strengths and highlights for me include learning through shared experience and critical...
Julie Lyford

Julie Lyford, Groundswell Gloucester

Such a long fight. Without you and the Change Agency we would be floundering. Thank you so much for your energy, passion, wisdom and guidance and for all that you do in changing the world.
2016-09-30T13:24:47+00:00
Julie Lyford
Such a long fight. Without you and the Change Agency we would be floundering. Thank you so much for your energy, passion, wisdom and guidance and for all that you do in changing the world.
thea

Thea Ormerod, Australian Religious Response to Climate Change

Whereas I had been working intuitively and reasonably well as a part of with a team of dedicated volunteers, the Community Organising Fellowship is providing a range of easy-to-understand useful tools which will help ARRCC to be much more effective. The training is carefully crafted to maximise skills development so we can use our limited resources in a way which will deliver results far more strategically. I already have quite a clear vision of how to successfully motivate our volunteers into participating more actively in the change effort.
2015-03-17T19:24:22+00:00
thea
Whereas I had been working intuitively and reasonably well as a part of with a team of dedicated volunteers, the Community Organising Fellowship is providing a range of easy-to-understand useful tools which will help ARRCC to be much more effective. The training is carefully crafted to maximise skills development so we can use our limited...